Items filtered by date: December 2021

People with diabetes can often lose feeling in their feet and the ability to heal ordinary cuts, abrasions or pressure points. This can lead to the development of non-healing wounds and far more serious complications. Foot care can help the diabetic keep their feet healthy and protected. The best way for diabetics to take care of their feet is by wearing quality shoes that fit perfectly and refraining from going barefoot — even in the house. Daily foot inspections are also a must in order to spot anything unusual. If any abrasion, discoloration, redness or purple area is detected, it is suggested that you seek the treatment of a podiatrist as soon as possible to avoid it festering and turning into a wound. For detailed information on diabetic foot care as well as regular foot checkups, please schedule an appointment with a podiatrist.

Diabetic foot care is important in preventing foot ailments such as ulcers. If you are suffering from diabetes or have any other concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Lexington Foot and Ankle Center, PSC. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Diabetic Foot Care

Diabetes affects millions of people every year. The condition can damage blood vessels in many parts of the body, especially the feet. Because of this, taking care of your feet is essential if you have diabetes, and having a podiatrist help monitor your foot health is highly recommended.

The Importance of Caring for Your Feet

  • Routinely inspect your feet for bruises or sores.
  • Wear socks that fit your feet comfortably.
  • Wear comfortable shoes that provide adequate support.

Patients with diabetes should have their doctor monitor their blood levels, as blood sugar levels play such a huge role in diabetic care. Monitoring these levels on a regular basis is highly advised.

It is always best to inform your healthcare professional of any concerns you may have regarding your feet, especially for diabetic patients. Early treatment and routine foot examinations are keys to maintaining proper health, especially because severe complications can arise if proper treatment is not applied.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Harrodsburg, Frankfort, Georgetown, Lexington, Owentown, and Flemingsburg, KY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about How to Care for Diabetic Foot

People with diabetes are at a substantially increased risk of developing foot wounds, open sores on the feet that heal slowly and poorly. One of the reasons that these wounds heal inefficiently may be due to a poor immune response. People with diabetes are more likely to have immune insufficiency. When a wound develops on the foot, the immune cells that are necessary for healthy inflammation and healing may have their functions suppressed, leading to poor healing. If you have diabetes, it is important to take measures to prevent foot wounds and their complications. One of the best ways to do this is to inspect your feet daily for any changes, such as new cuts, scrapes, sores, or discoloration. If you notice that anything is out of the ordinary, it is strongly suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist. 

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with one of our podiatrists from Lexington Foot and Ankle Center, PSC. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Harrodsburg, Frankfort, Georgetown, Lexington, Owentown, and Flemingsburg, KY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Friday, 17 December 2021 00:00

Wounds That Don't Heal Need to Be Checked

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

Pregnancy is often accompanied by swollen feet and ankles. This occurs because the body is creating and retaining more fluid, and the uterus is growing. Both of these factors can cause the feet and ankles to swell, a condition known as edema. You can help ease the symptoms of edema by sleeping on the left side of your body to reduce pressure on the vein that returns blood to your heart, and by trying not to stand for prolonged periods of time. While sitting, avoid crossing your legs, and try to elevate and stretch them as often as possible. Maternity stockings may help, as well as exercising regularly, keeping yourself hydrated, and trying to stay as cool as you can in hot weather. Your feet expand during pregnancy and are also under a great deal more pressure. Check with a podiatrist for recommendations on footwear and orthotics to help your feet withstand the extra weight and pressure, as well as other methods of reducing edema.

Pregnant women with swollen feet can be treated with a variety of different methods that are readily available. For more information about other cures for swollen feet during pregnancy, consult with one of our podiatrists from Lexington Foot and Ankle Center, PSC. Our doctors will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

What Foot Problems Can Arise During Pregnancy?

One problem that can occur is overpronation, which occurs when the arch of the foot flattens and tends to roll inward.  This can cause pain and discomfort in your heels while you’re walking or even just standing up, trying to support your baby.  

Another problem is edema, or swelling in the extremities. This often affects the feet during pregnancy but tends to occur in the later stages. 

How Can I Keep My Feet Healthy During Pregnancy?

  • Wearing orthotics can provide extra support for the feet and help distribute weight evenly
  • Minimize the amount of time spent walking barefoot
  • Wear shoes with good arch support
  • Wear shoes that allow for good circulation to the feet
  • Elevate feet if you experience swelling
  • Massage your feet
  • Get regular, light exercise, such as walking, to promote blood circulation to the feet

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Harrodsburg, Frankfort, Georgetown, Lexington, Owentown, and Flemingsburg, KY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Foot Care for Pregnant Women
Tuesday, 07 December 2021 00:00

Risk Factors for Achilles Tendon Ruptures

The Achilles tendon is the large tendon at the back of the ankle that connects the calf muscle to the heel bone. One common injury that occurs with the Achilles tendon is a rupture. This can either be a partial or a complete tear of the tendon, and it usually occurs during sporting activities like basketball and tennis, where pushing off and sprinting is frequent. While Achilles tendon ruptures can happen to anyone, they tend to affect males and people between the ages of 30 and 40. Other patients who are at a high risk for ruptures include those with poor flexibility, an inactive lifestyle, or who are on steroid medications.  Achilles tendon ruptures are often indicated by abrupt pain in the affected area, the feeling of getting kicked in the back of the leg, weakness and bruising in the area, and a potential “popping” sound. Patients who may have ruptured their Achilles tendon, or would like information on preventing future ruptures, should consult with a podiatrist.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact one of our podiatrists of Lexington Foot and Ankle Center, PSC. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Harrodsburg, Frankfort, Georgetown, Lexington, Owentown, and Flemingsburg, KY . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What are Achilles Tendon Injuries

Connect With Us