Items filtered by date: October 2021

Wednesday, 27 October 2021 00:00

Ways to Avoid Falling at Home

Falling is one of the leading causes of injury among those older than 65. In fact, one out of every 4 seniors will fall each year. Thankfully, there are plenty of simple things that can be done in order to prevent falls in the home. One step that can be done is to keep the floors at home clutter-free in order to avoid tripping. Installing grab bars in the bathrooms and handrails around staircases can help provide stability and prevent falls. One of the most important things that can be done to avoid falling is to consult with a podiatrist about any falls that you may have experienced, or for more professional advice on fall prevention. A podiatrist will be able to help check your feet and give advice on proper footwear that should be worn as well as review any medications that may make you dizzy or lead to instability. 

Preventing falls among the elderly is very important. If you are older and have fallen or fear that you are prone to falling, consult with one of our podiatrists from Lexington Foot and Ankle Center, PSC. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality advice and care.

Every 11 seconds, an elderly American is being treated in an emergency room for a fall related injury. Falls are the leading cause of head and hip injuries for those 65 and older. Due to decreases in strength, balance, senses, and lack of awareness, elderly persons are very susceptible to falling. Thankfully, there are a number of things older persons can do to prevent falls.

How to Prevent Falls

Some effective methods that older persons can do to prevent falls include:

  • Enrolling in strength and balance exercise program to increase balance and strength
  • Periodically having your sight and hearing checked
  • Discuss any medications you have with a doctor to see if it increases the risk of falling
  • Clearing the house of falling hazards and installing devices like grab bars and railings
  • Utilizing a walker or cane
  • Wearing shoes that provide good support and cushioning
  • Talking to family members about falling and increasing awareness

Falling can be a traumatic and embarrassing experience for elderly persons; this can make them less willing to leave the house, and less willing to talk to someone about their fears of falling. Doing such things, however, will increase the likelihood of tripping or losing one’s balance. Knowing the causes of falling and how to prevent them is the best way to mitigate the risk of serious injury.  

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Harrodsburg, Frankfort, Georgetown, Lexington, Owentown, and Flemingsburg, KY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 19 October 2021 00:00

Battling Bony Bunions

Bunions are bony protrusions at the base of the big toe which have developed over time. Repeated pressure on the toe can gradually shift it out of position and tilt towards the other toes. Bunions are also referred to as Hallux abductovalgus, Hallux valgus, HAV, and HV. It is believed that genetics and wearing high heels or narrow-toed footwear can increase the risk of developing this condition. Other conditions that may also contribute to bunions forming include certain types of arthritis, flat feet, and rare genetic bone disorders. Painful bunions can be treated by a podiatrist in a variety of ways from padding and taping, to custom orthotics, night-time splints, icing and other therapies, and by switching to proper footwear. In the most severe cases, a podiatric surgeon can remove the bunion and restore the natural position and beauty of the toe.

If you are suffering from bunions, contact one of our podiatrists of Lexington Foot and Ankle Center, PSC. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

A bunion is formed of swollen tissue or an enlargement of boney growth, usually located at the base joint of the toe that connects to the foot. The swelling occurs due to the bones in the big toe shifting inward, which impacts the other toes of the foot. This causes the area around the base of the big toe to become inflamed and painful.

Why Do Bunions Form?

Genetics – Susceptibility to bunions are often hereditary

Stress on the feet – Poorly fitted and uncomfortable footwear that places stress on feet, such as heels, can worsen existing bunions

How Are Bunions Diagnosed?

Doctors often perform two tests – blood tests and x-rays – when trying to diagnose bunions, especially in the early stages of development. Blood tests help determine if the foot pain is being caused by something else, such as arthritis, while x-rays provide a clear picture of your bone structure to your doctor.

How Are Bunions Treated?

  • Refrain from wearing heels or similar shoes that cause discomfort
  • Select wider shoes that can provide more comfort and reduce pain
  • Anti-inflammatory and pain management drugs
  • Orthotics or foot inserts
  • Surgery

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Harrodsburg, Frankfort, Georgetown, Lexington, Owentown, and Flemingsburg, KY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 18 October 2021 00:00

Heel Pain Can Be Treated!

Do you suffer from heel pain when you get up in the morning? If so, you should seek the professional help of your podiatrist and have a proper diagnosis performed. Heel pain can be caused by several different foot-related conditions.

Tuesday, 12 October 2021 00:00

When Ankle Sprains Do Not Heal Properly 

Ankle sprains are common injuries that cause the ligaments that support the ankle joint to become overly stretched or torn. If an ankle sprain does not heal properly additional sprains may occur, which may lead to ankle instability. Ankle instability can cause pain, tenderness, or swelling in the ankle, as well as make it feel wobbly or loose. Your weakened ankle may also roll out frequently on the lateral side of your foot when you are walking, standing, or playing sports. If you exhibit any of these symptoms and have had previous ankle sprains, you may be experiencing chronic ankle instability. Make an appointment with a podiatrist to receive a proper diagnosis and determine a treatment method that is specific to you. 

Although ankle sprains are common, they aren’t always minor injuries. If you need your ankle injury looked at, contact one of our podiatrists from Lexington Foot and Ankle Center, PSC. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains are the result of a tear in the ligaments within the ankle. These injuries may happen when you make a rapid shifting movement while your foot is planted. A less common way to sprain your ankle is when your ankle rolls inward while your foot turns outward.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Pain at the sight of the tear
  • Bruising/Swelling
  • Ankle area is tender to touch
  • In severe cases, may hear/feel something tear
  • Skin discoloration

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

In many cases, the RICE method (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevate) is used to treat ankle sprains. However, you should see a podiatrist to see which treatment option would work best with your injury. In severe cases, surgery may be required.

It is important to ask your doctor about rehab options after you receive treatment for your injury. Stretching, strength training, and balance exercises may help the ankle heal while also preventing further injury.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Harrodsburg, Frankfort, Georgetown, Lexington, Owentown, and Flemingsburg, KY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Millions of people in America suffer from diabetes, which often leads to complications in their feet. Diabetes impairs the body’s ability to regulate blood glucose levels. This, in turn, disrupts the functionality of white blood cells which are critical in closing wounds. Additionally, diabetes can lead to poor circulation, and this reduces the amount of nutrients sent to wound sites and further impairs the healing process. Neuropathy, or nerve damage, is another condition associated with diabetes. Neuropathy further complicates diabetic wound management because it can prevent diabetic adults from feeling when there is trauma or an injury to their skin, and wounds may progress before they are even discovered. All of these factors combined make the diabetic wound harder to detect and heal, which may lead to infection and worse—if it's not treated properly. If you are diabetic, it's important to be under the care of a podiatrist who can offer preventative measures against foot wounds and treat them promptly and properly if they do develop.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with one of our podiatrists from Lexington Foot and Ankle Center, PSC. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Harrodsburg, Frankfort, Georgetown, Lexington, Owentown, and Flemingsburg, KY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 05 October 2021 00:00

Does Your Ankle Hurt Out of Nowhere?

While most of the time ankle pain generates from an injury, it sometimes occurs without an obvious incident you can pin point it back to. Ankle pain can actually occur due to a variety of underlying causes that you may not have considered, including arthritis. The 3 types of arthritis that primarily affects the ankles are osteoarthritis (where the cartilage between the bones begins to wear away), rheumatoid arthritis (an autoimmune disorder that causes the immune system to attack healthy joints), or reactive arthritis (which is caused by a bacterial infection in another part of the body). Other various conditions, such as gout, fallen arches, a bone or joint infection, bursitis, or even lupus can lead to unexplainable ankle pain.  If you have ankle pain, consulting with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis is highly suggested. Upon diagnosis, a podiatrist will also be able to help suggest treatment options for your specific condition.

Ankle pain can have many different causes and the pain may potentially be serious. If you have ankle pain, consult with one of our podiatrists from Lexington Foot and Ankle Center, PSC. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Ankle pain is any condition that causes pain in the ankle. Due to the fact that the ankle consists of tendons, muscles, bones, and ligaments, ankle pain can come from a number of different conditions.

Causes

The most common causes of ankle pain include:

  • Types of arthritis (rheumatoid, osteoarthritis, and gout)
  • Ankle sprains
  • Broken ankles
  • Achilles tendinitis
  • Achilles tendon rupture
  • Stress fractures
  • Tarsal tunnel syndrome
  • Plantar fasciitis

Symptoms

Symptoms of ankle injury vary based upon the condition. Pain may include general pain and discomfort, swelling, aching, redness, bruising, burning or stabbing sensations, and/or loss of sensation.

Diagnosis

Due to the wide variety of potential causes of ankle pain, podiatrists will utilize a number of different methods to properly diagnose ankle pain. This can include asking for personal and family medical histories and of any recent injuries. Further diagnosis may include sensation tests, a physical examination, and potentially x-rays or other imaging tests.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are rest, ice packs, keeping pressure off the foot, orthotics and braces, medication for inflammation and pain, and surgery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Harrodsburg, Frankfort, Georgetown, Lexington, Owentown, and Flemingsburg, KY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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