Items filtered by date: April 2021

Monday, 26 April 2021 00:00

Why Ankles Are so Important to Mobility

The ankle is a joint that connects the leg to the foot using a series of bones including the fibula, tibia, and the tarsal bones of the foot. The ankle is an integral part of a complex system that continually keeps our bodies balanced when we stand, and aids in our overall mobility. The foot needs the ankle in order to move up and down (dorsiflexion and plantarflexion), side-to-side (inversion and eversion), and to rotate either inward or outward (medially and laterally). Because of how active the ankle is in everyday movements as well as athletic activities, ankle injuries are quite common. Additionally, as we age, ankle mobility declines and makes us more prone to falling and other accidents. If you are experiencing any type of issue with your ankle, contact a podiatrist who can examine you and perform a variety of tests to detect any underlying cause of ankle pain, weakness, or mobility deterioration.

Foot and ankle trauma is common among athletes and the elderly. If you have concerns that you may have experienced trauma to the foot and ankle, consult with one of our podiatrists from Lexington Foot and Ankle Center, PSC. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Foot and ankle trauma cover a range of injuries all over the foot; common injuries include:

  • Broken bones
  • Muscle strains
  • Injuries to the tendons and ligaments
  • Stress fractures

Symptoms

Symptoms of foot and ankle injuries vary depending on the injury, but more common ones include:

  • Bruising
  • Inflammation/ Swelling
  • Pain

Diagnosis

To properly diagnose the exact type of injury, podiatrists will conduct a number of different tests. Some of these include sensation and visual tests, X-rays, and MRIs. Medical and family histories will also be taken into account.

Treatment

Once the injury has been diagnosed, the podiatrist can than offer the best treatment options for you. In less severe cases, rest and keeping pressure off the foot may be all that’s necessary. Orthotics, such as a specially made shoes, or immobilization devices, like splints or casts, may be deemed necessary. Finally, if the injury is severe enough, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in St. Joseph Office Park, Frankfort, Georgetown, Lexington, Owentown, and Flemingsburg, KY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Wednesday, 21 April 2021 00:00

Are You Suffering From Ingrown Toenails?

If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to more serious concerns, such as an infection. Knowing proper nail care can help in the prevention of an ingrown toenail. Give us a call, and get treated!

Monday, 19 April 2021 00:00

Are Cracked Heels Dangerous?

At best, cracked heels are unsightly and bothersome. Left untreated, these dry, flaky and hard fissures can deepen and become infected. Cracked heels are dangerous to people with diabetes, and at worst they can lead to foot ulcers that may not heal. Cracked heels can occur if you walk barefoot frequently or wear shoes that expose your heels. You are also more susceptible to developing cracked heels if you live in a dry climate, are obese, or have sweat glands that do not function properly. You can help avoid getting cracked heels by keeping yourself hydrated, moisturizing your heels twice a day, and always wearing socks or shoes that cover the back of your feet and offer proper shock absorption with adequate soles. If the cracks deepen, bleed, or are painful, a podiatrist can treat or remove them and prescribe antibiotics if they are infected.

Cracked heels are unsightly and can cause further damage to your shoes and feet. If you have any concerns, contact one of our podiatrists from Lexington Foot and Ankle Center, PSC. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Cracked Heels

Cracked heels appear unappealing and can make it harder for you walk around in sandals. Aside from looking unpleasant, cracked heels can also tear stockings, socks, and wear out your shoes. There are several methods to help restore a cracked heel and prevent further damage.

How Do You Get Them?

Dry skin is the number one culprit in creating cracked heels. Many athletes, walkers, joggers, and even swimmers suffer from cracked heels. Age and skin oil production play a role to getting cracked heels as well.

Promote Healing

Over the counter medicines can help, especially for those that need instant relief or who suffer from chronic dry feet.

Wear Socks – Wearing socks with medicated creams helps lock in moisture.

Moisturizers – Applying both day and night will help alleviate dryness which causes cracking.

Pumice Stones – These exfoliate and remove dead skin, which allows for smoother moisturizer application and better absorption into the skin. 

Change in Diet

Eating healthy with a well-balanced diet will give the skin a fresh and radiant look. Your body responds to the kinds of food you ingest. Omega-3 fatty acids and zinc supplements can also revitalize skin tissue.

Most importantly, seek professional help if unsure how to proceed in treating cracked heels. A podiatrist will help you with any questions or information needed. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in St. Joseph Office Park, Frankfort, Georgetown, Lexington, Owentown, and Flemingsburg, KY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 12 April 2021 00:00

Two Tiny Bones and a Big Toe

Sesamoids are tiny bones located within tendons that connect to muscles—as opposed to most bones which link to one another via joints. The patella, or kneecap, is the largest sesamoid, while the two sesamoids on the bottom of the feet near the big toe (the tibial and the fibular) are pea-sized. Despite their small size, these two sesamoids bear the body’s weight and the tendons they are attached to can become inflamed if they are overly stressed from high heels or activities such as ballet, basketball, or running. This condition is called sesamoiditis and can cause gradually-worsening pain under the ball of the foot, and popping sensations or difficulty bending the big toe. If you experience any of these symptoms, a podiatrist can thoroughly examine you and may utilize an X-ray, bone scan, MRI or ultrasound to determine if you have sesamoiditis. Treatment may involve lifestyle or footwear modifications, medications, or orthotics. Severe cases of sesamoiditis that do not respond to traditional treatment may require surgery.

Sesamoiditis is an unpleasant foot condition characterized by pain in the balls of the feet. If you think you’re struggling with sesamoiditis, contact one of our podiatrists of Lexington Foot and Ankle Center, PSC. Our doctors will treat your condition thoroughly and effectively.

Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis is a condition of the foot that affects the ball of the foot. It is more common in younger people than it is in older people. It can also occur with people who have begun a new exercise program, since their bodies are adjusting to the new physical regimen. Pain may also be caused by the inflammation of tendons surrounding the bones. It is important to seek treatment in its early stages because if you ignore the pain, this condition can lead to more serious problems such as severe irritation and bone fractures.

Causes of Sesamoiditis

  • Sudden increase in activity
  • Increase in physically strenuous movement without a proper warm up or build up
  • Foot structure: those who have smaller, bonier feet or those with a high arch may be more susceptible

Treatment for sesamoiditis is non-invasive and simple. Doctors may recommend a strict rest period where the patient forgoes most physical activity. This will help give the patient time to heal their feet through limited activity. For serious cases, it is best to speak with your doctor to determine a treatment option that will help your specific needs.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in St. Joseph Office Park, Frankfort, Georgetown, Lexington, Owentown, and Flemingsburg, KY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 05 April 2021 00:00

Can Children Get Plantar Warts?

The papillomavirus is responsible for warts in both adults and children. Although pediatric warts are said to be more common, anyone can become affected. Warts are usually not painful unless they occur on the soles of the feet, as is the case with plantar warts. These flat, thick, callus-like warts can grow singularly or even in a cluster, causing a “mosaic” on the bottom of the feet. Sometimes small black dots, which are clotted blood vessels, may be visible within the wart. While warts usually go away after some time, they can be quite tender and stubborn. If your child has developed plantar warts that are painful or persistent, it is suggested that you make an appointment with a podiatrist. A podiatrist can use a variety of medicines and treatments depending on the severity of the warts, your child’s age, medical history, and tolerance for medical procedures.

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact one of our podiatrists from Lexington Foot and Ankle Center, PSC. Our doctors will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in St. Joseph Office Park, Frankfort, Georgetown, Lexington, Owentown, and Flemingsburg, KY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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